Podcasts: Exhibit AI

Exhibit AI is a podcast series presented by CLCT exploring contemporary legal issues for tomorrow’s technology. With exciting guest speakers from industry, law, technology, academia, and CLCT’s own staff researchers, Exhibit AI invites listeners to join the conversation and examine the intersection of law, AI, and other emerging technologies.

Listen on demand and find episode descriptions below.

Exhibit 0: Introduction to Exhibit AI Podcast Series

In this premier episode, host Taylor Treece (CLCT Buswell Post-Graduate Fellow) is joined by CLCT Director and Chancellor Professor of Law Fred Lederer and Associate Director for Research and Visiting Assistant Professor Iria Giuffrida to introduce CLCT’s new podcast series: Exhibit AI.

Listen to more about CLCT’s current research on the intersection of law, AI, and other emerging technologies, and about topics and guests expected on upcoming episodes of Exhibit AI.

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of William and Mary Law School or any other affiliated institutions.

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Exhibit 1: AI & the Law of War with Professor Gary Brown

On Monday, February 4, 2019, Professor Gary Brown sat down with CLCT to discuss artificial intelligence (AI) and the law of war. Joined by William & Mary Law Professors Fred Lederer (CLCT Director) and Iria Giuffrida (CLCT Associate Director for Research), this 45-minute interview surveys key legal issues involving AI, Lethal Autonomous Weapon Systems, cyber warfare, and international law.

Guest Speaker Bio:
Gary Brown currently serves as Professor of Practice at the College of Information and Cyberspace, at National Defense University. Professor Brown served for 25 years as a Judge Advocate with the United States Air Force, culminating in his role as first senior legal counsel for the U.S. Cyber Command. From there, he served as Head of Communications and Congressional Affairs for the Washington Delegation of the International Committee of the Red Cross, and then he became a Professor of Cyber Security at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. He also worked as a Cyber Policy and Strategy Analysis for the U.S. Department of Justice. Professor Brown is active in education, consulting, and advocacy regarding cyber law and policy, and regularly speaks on cyber operations law and policy.

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of the U.S. Department of Defense, The National Defense University, William and Mary Law School, or any other affiliated institutions.

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Exhibit 2: Blockchain in Evidence & as Evidence Record Systems

Blockchain seems to be everywhere: from cryptocurrency to smart contract and more. Increasingly, many industries are asking whether blockchain is a solution for their business objectives and concerns. With the increased use of this often misunderstood technology, legal issues are bound to arise. To brace for change, CLCT is asking the questions lawyers will want to know — starting with “what is blockchain anyway?”

In this episode, Exhibit AI explores this question, and the inevitable ramifications for blockchain in litigation. Host Taylor Treece (CLCT Buswell Post-Graduate Fellow) discusses major issues for blockchain and evidence with CLCT’s Graduate Research Fellows Alex Ashrafi and Scott Meyer. Together, they cover the basics of blockchain, popular blockchain use cases for lawyers to look out for, the application of Federal Rules of Evidence to blockchain, recent blockchain specific state evidentiary rules, the results of a “blockchain mock trial,” and the potential for blockchain to be used as an evidence record keeping system.

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of William and Mary Law School or any other affiliated institutions.

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Exhibit 3: Regulating the “Car of the Future” Today — Autonomous Vehicles

Once hailed as the cars of the future, self-driving or autonomous vehicles (AV) are quickly becoming a contemporary reality — but one with significant legal and policy implications. Regulators have been eager to pass legislation and issue orders governing this new technology, leading to a patchwork of state laws. Federal regulators have also had their eyes on AVs, but comprehensive federal legislation has not yet come to fruition. The question becomes — should we look to federal law for AV technology?

In this episode, Taylor Treece, David Lim, and Daniel Shin. Together, they work through major legal hurdles AV regulation should address, consider international approaches to AVs, and weigh the pros and cons of state versus federal regulation.

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of William and Mary Law School or any other affiliated institutions.

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Exhibit 4: VR in the Courtroom

Over the past decade, virtual reality has gone from an experimental pipedream to a multi-billion dollar market reality. While much has been made of the entertainment and educational possibilities of the technology, VR also has use cases in the legal system.

In this episode, Brennan McGovern, Ott Lindstrom, and Alex Ashrafi work through the practical and evidentiary considerations that may arise if VR is implemented in the courtroom.

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of William and Mary Law School or any other affiliated institutions.

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This content has been updated on October 16, 2019 at 9:58 am.