Podcasts: Exhibit AI

Exhibit AI is a podcast series presented by CLCT exploring contemporary legal issues for tomorrow’s technology. With exciting guest speakers from industry, law, technology, academia, and CLCT’s own staff researchers, Exhibit AI invites listeners to join the conversation and examine the intersection of law, AI, and other emerging technologies.

Listen on demand and find episode descriptions below.

Exhibit 0: Introduction to Exhibit AI Podcast Series

In this premier episode, host Taylor Treece (CLCT Buswell Post-Graduate Fellow) is joined by CLCT Director and Chancellor Professor of Law Fred Lederer and Associate Director for Research and Visiting Assistant Professor Iria Giuffrida to introduce CLCT’s new podcast series: Exhibit AI.

Listen to more about CLCT’s current research on the intersection of law, AI, and other emerging technologies, and about topics and guests expected on upcoming episodes of Exhibit AI.

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of William & Mary Law School or any other affiliated institutions.

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Exhibit 1: AI & the Law of War with Professor Gary Brown

On Monday, February 4, 2019, Professor Gary Brown sat down with CLCT to discuss artificial intelligence (AI) and the law of war. Joined by William & Mary Law Professors Fred Lederer (CLCT Director) and Iria Giuffrida (CLCT Associate Director for Research), this 45-minute interview surveys key legal issues involving AI, Lethal Autonomous Weapon Systems, cyber warfare, and international law.

Guest Speaker Bio:
Gary Brown currently serves as Professor of Practice at the College of Information and Cyberspace, at National Defense University. Professor Brown served for 25 years as a Judge Advocate with the United States Air Force, culminating in his role as first senior legal counsel for the U.S. Cyber Command. From there, he served as Head of Communications and Congressional Affairs for the Washington Delegation of the International Committee of the Red Cross, and then he became a Professor of Cyber Security at Marine Corps University in Quantico, Virginia. He also worked as a Cyber Policy and Strategy Analysis for the U.S. Department of Justice. Professor Brown is active in education, consulting, and advocacy regarding cyber law and policy, and regularly speaks on cyber operations law and policy.

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of the U.S. Department of Defense, The National Defense University, William & Mary Law School, or any other affiliated institutions.

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Exhibit 2: Blockchain in Evidence & as Evidence Record Systems

Blockchain seems to be everywhere: from cryptocurrency to smart contract and more. Increasingly, many industries are asking whether blockchain is a solution for their business objectives and concerns. With the increased use of this often misunderstood technology, legal issues are bound to arise. To brace for change, CLCT is asking the questions lawyers will want to know — starting with “what is blockchain anyway?”

In this episode, Exhibit AI explores this question, and the inevitable ramifications for blockchain in litigation. Host Taylor Treece (CLCT Buswell Post-Graduate Fellow) discusses major issues for blockchain and evidence with CLCT’s Graduate Research Fellows Alex Ashrafi and Scott Meyer. Together, they cover the basics of blockchain, popular blockchain use cases for lawyers to look out for, the application of Federal Rules of Evidence to blockchain, recent blockchain specific state evidentiary rules, the results of a “blockchain mock trial,” and the potential for blockchain to be used as an evidence record keeping system.

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of William & Mary Law School or any other affiliated institutions.

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Exhibit 3: Regulating the “Car of the Future” Today — Autonomous Vehicles

Once hailed as the cars of the future, self-driving or autonomous vehicles (AV) are quickly becoming a contemporary reality — but one with significant legal and policy implications. Regulators have been eager to pass legislation and issue orders governing this new technology, leading to a patchwork of state laws. Federal regulators have also had their eyes on AVs, but comprehensive federal legislation has not yet come to fruition. The question becomes — should we look to federal law for AV technology?

In this episode, Taylor Treece, David Lim, and Daniel Shin. Together, they work through major legal hurdles AV regulation should address, consider international approaches to AVs, and weigh the pros and cons of state versus federal regulation.

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of William & Mary Law School or any other affiliated institutions.

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Exhibit 4: VR in the Courtroom

Over the past decade, virtual reality has gone from an experimental pipedream to a multi-billion dollar market reality. While much has been made of the entertainment and educational possibilities of the technology, VR also has use cases in the legal system.

In this episode, Brennan McGovern, Ott Lindstrom, and Alex Ashrafi work through the practical and evidentiary considerations that may arise if VR is implemented in the courtroom.

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of William & Mary Law School or any other affiliated institutions.

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Exhibit 5: What is Artificial Intelligence?

In this episode, Evan Strasnick, a Stanford Ph.D. candidate researching Human-Computer Interactions, joins host Nicholas Sas and CLCT’s Deputy Director Iria Giuffrida for a discussion on how to define AI, how to interpret AI-driven results, the importance of data, and the ethical implications of using such technology.

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of William & Mary Law School, Stanford University or any other affiliated institutions.

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Exhibit 6: Smart Cities – The Legal Landscape

This episode kicks off a new podcast series looking at the developing legal landscape surrounding smart city technology. Innovations such as smart homes, smart transportation, autonomous vehicles, and the like have the capacity to take city planning by storm, and upend the way citizens and businesses interact with the communities within which they live and work. This innovation comes with great promises, but also its share of problems. The most often discussed issues are concerns surrounding data and personal privacy, cybersecurity, and liability. Recognizing that there are likely other legal challenges associated with this technology, our research teams plan to introduce discussion that goes beyond these immediate legal questions. In this episode, Buswell Post-Grad Fellow Lindsey Whitlow hosts the Smart Cities Research Team—CLCT Research Fellows Alexandra Pratt, Carl “Ott” Lindstrom, and Katherine Sorrell—in giving a broad overview of what smart cities are and how they implicate the law. For resources and additional information found in this episode, click here (PDF).

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of William & Mary Law School or any other affiliated institutions.

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Exhibit 7: Smart Cities and the First Amendment

In this first in-depth discussion of the interaction between the law and smart cities, we examine how the First Amendment may be implicated. Of the enumerated rights granted under the U.S. Constitution, those of the First Amendment are often hailed the most important and fundamental rights afforded to U.S. citizens. The big question, then, is whether smart cities will “chill” the ability for citizens to take advantage of these rights. CLCT Research Fellows Taylor Lain (host) and Alex Pratt explore the implications of public-private partnerships in smart cities on the freedom of speech, freedom to petition, and freedom of assembly. For resources and additional information found in this episode, click here (PDF). Special thanks go to Professor Timothy Zick, John Marshall Professor of Government and Citizenship and Cabell Research Professor, for his assistance with First Amendment doctrine.

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of William & Mary Law School or any other affiliated institutions.

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Exhibit 8: Smart Cities and the Fourth & Fourteenth Amendments

In this second substantive episode in our Smart Cities series, host Taylor Lain leads the continued discussion of the interaction between the technology powering smart cities and constitutional law. Joined by Research Fellows Ott Lindstrom and Reed McLeod, this episode zooms in on the Fourth Amendment—exploring the concepts of the “reasonable expectation of privacy,” and the third-party doctrine in the context of the ubiquitous use of Internet of Things (IoT) devices. They will also explore Section One of the Fourteenth Amendment, examining how a party may have recourse, if any, when injured by unequal representation under the Equal Protection Clause. For resources and additional information found in this episode, click here (PDF). Special thanks go to Professor Jeffrey Bellin, University Professor for Teaching Excellence and Robert and Elizabeth Scott Research Professor of Law, for his assistance with Fourth Amendment doctrine.

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of William & Mary Law School or any other affiliated institutions.

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Exhibit 9: Smart Cities & Civil Rights, Part I

In this episode, CLCT Research Fellows Taylor Lain (host), Katherine Sorrell, and Alex Pratt explore the implications of smart city technology for members of the intellectual and developmentally disabled (“I/DD”) community. As the world’s largest minority group, the I/DD community has the unique characteristic of being intersectional—many members of the community are also members of other minority groups. Tracing the history of legal protection for this community, real visibility in the law is only as recent as 30 years ago, with the passing of the Americans with Disabilities Act (1990). Our Fellows note that smart city technologists and engineers have the opportunity to account for the difficulties faced by this group before and during the design process, rather than as an afterthought. For resources and additional information found in this episode, click here (PDF).

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of William & Mary Law School or any other affiliated institutions.

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Exhibit 10: Smart Cities & Civil Rights, Part II

Continuing our discussion of smart city technology and civil rights, CLCT Research Fellows Taylor Lain (host), Katherine Sorrell, and Alex Pratt explore the implications of specific smart city technology, such as facial recognition, predictive policing, and risk-assessment tools, and how these tools may affect minority or disadvantaged populations. While it is clear that there are major benefits in law enforcement using this technology, the team also discusses common concerns about the use and misuse of data gathered for such purposes. They then examine how one group in particular, immigrant communities, may be impacted by facial recognition technology. For resources and addiional information on topics covered in this episode, click here (PDF).

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of William & Mary Law School or any other affiliated institutions.

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Exhibit 11: Smart Cities & The Takings Clause

In this episode, 2019-2020 postgraduate Buswell Research Fellow Lindsey Whitlow hosts recent William & Mary Law School graduates Alexandra Pratt and Andrew Parslow. The discussion begins with a brief history of the discipline of urban planning before diving into just some of the complexities of the Takings Clause of the Fifth Amendment. Our researchers explore how smart city plans may come into conflict with the Takings Clause, and how some technologies that may benefit the smart city could also run into problems with existing laws and regulations. For resources and additional information found in this episode, click here (PDF).

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of William & Mary Law School or any other affiliated institutions.

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Exhibit 12: Smart Cities – Global Implications

In this episode, 2019-2020 postgraduate Buswell Research Fellow Lindsey Whitlow hosts her final episode before the conclusion of her fellowship. She is joined by CLCT Research Fellows Katherine Sorrell, Mechelle King, and Sam Habein to discuss the global implications of smart city technology. Our researchers explore how smart city plans may come into conflict with International Human Rights Law, and discuss governance of multinational corporations as a part of the ongoing conversation on public-private partnerships in this space. After taking a brief look at International Human Rights Law and several important U.N. Declarations, each of our Fellows takes in turn a case study based on a self-proclaimed smart city to provide tangible examples of how this technology can affect human rights. For resources and additional information found in this episode, click here (PDF).

The views and opinions expressed in this interview are the personal views of the speakers, and do not represent the official position of William & Mary Law School or any other affiliated institutions.

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This content has been updated on August 17, 2020 at 10:17 am.